The Eucharist and Communion

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I meant to write this a month ago, but you know how it goes sometimes. It has now been over a full year since I rejoined the Catholic Church. I have learned so much over the past year. So much now that I never understood is so clear to me now; I don’t understand how it never made sense to me.

The Eucharist has become so precious to me. Before, as a Protestant, we always talk about having fellowship with God, and obeying his ordinances of Baptism and the Communion. I have always wanted to be part of churches that take on as literal of an interpretation of the Bible as possible. Yet on these two points the most literal interpretation is not the Baptist, or Plymouth Brethren interpretation, it is that of the Catholic Church. Fundamentalists claim to be literal, but they refuse to take Jesus at his word on these two sacraments.

Fundamentalists talk of fellowship with the Lord. But only the Catholic Church really offers either. Here we have Christ taking the form of bread to become one with us. Protestants talk of receiving the Lord into their hearts, but Catholics literally take Him into our hearts, and stomach, and skin, and eyes, and even the ends of our hair and fingernails. We become one with Him, in the much same way that a man and wife become one. This is not accidental. We are his Bride, and he wants to be one with us.

Fundamentalists talk of Communion with other believers, but only Catholics also believe that we can still have fellowship and union with believers who have died. The writer of Hebrews describes some of the great men of the faith throughout history. Then in chapter 12 he says “we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses.” Not “we will be someday when we get to heaven too”; but “we are surrounded” by them.

Note that this cannot be the “invisible” church; these are Old Testament Hebrews and Jews! They are not part of the Church. But the Church, as the New Jerusalem, is in complete communion with the Old Testament saints.

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Christ’s presence in the Eucharist

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If virtually all Christians believe that God can come to earth in the form and substance of a human being; why is it so difficult to believe that Christ can exist in the form of bread?